hokuto-ju-no-ken:

miidoriilol:

grandmasterbooty:

mooxy0u:

milkanclcookies:

this makes me so happy

HAS IT REALLY BEEN THAT LONG

numa numa era classic

lmao the kid in red cant even keep up with how nerdy he was as a child. dude in black is on point tho.

well holy shit

(Source: snailfairy, via hi)

henrycavills:

this is the best photo ive ever seen

(via hi)

(Source: clubpenguindoneright, via hi)

(Source: vert-ikaaa, via bellfry)

teamrocketing:

*on time travel bus* oh you’re going back to kill hitler? uh yeah totally, me too *pulls jacket over spice girls world tour ‘98 t shirt*

(via hi)

ilikelookingatnakedmen:

For anyone who needs boat references for art or fic. 

ilikelookingatnakedmen:

For anyone who needs boat references for art or fic. 

(Source: peynirkizartmasi, via bellfry)

victory-sashes:

FUCK I JUST SPAT OUT MY FUCKING RAMEN

victory-sashes:

FUCK I JUST SPAT OUT MY FUCKING RAMEN

(Source: pyroinohio, via hi)

wibbly-wobbly-blogging:

kurwah:

FMA AU in which every time Ed or Al say “brother” it’s replaced with “bruh”

image

"BRUH"

(via scootermoto)

socimages:

From dramatic mechanism to sitcom joke: the rise and fall of quicksand.
“For many of us, quicksand was once a real fear,” write the producers at Radio Lab:

It held a vise-grip on our imaginations, from childish sandbox games to grown-up anxieties about venturing into unknown lands. But these days, quicksand can’t even scare an 8-year-old.

Interviewing a class of fourth graders, writer Dan Engber discovered that most understood the concept, but didn’t find it particularly worrisome.  ”I usually don’t think about it,” said one.  They were more afraid of things like aliens, zombies, ghosts, and dinosaurs.  But they understood that it was something that people used to be afraid of: ”My dad told me that when he was little his friends always said ‘look out that could be quicksand!’”
Engber became fascinated with what happened to quicksand.  He found a source of data — compiled by, of all things, quicksand sexual fetishists — that included every movie scene that involved quicksand from the 1900s to the 2000s.  Comparing this number to the total number of movies produced allowed him to show that quicksand had a lifecourse.  It rose in the ’40s, skyrocketed in the ’60s, and then fell out of favor.
Why?
Engber found a pattern in the data.  In quicksand’s early years, the movie scenes featured quicksand as a very serious threat.  But, after quicksand peaked, it became a  joke.  In the ’80s, quicksand even made it into My Little Pony and Perfect Strangers.  Later, in discussions about plot lines for Lost, the idea of quicksand was dismissed as ridiculous.
I guess it’s fair to say that quicksand “jumped the shark.”
In sociology, we call this the social construction of social problems: the fact that our fears don’t perfectly correlate with the hazards we face.  In this case, media is implicated. What is it making us fear today?
Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions, with Myra Marx Ferree. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

socimages:

From dramatic mechanism to sitcom joke: the rise and fall of quicksand.

“For many of us, quicksand was once a real fear,” write the producers at Radio Lab:

It held a vise-grip on our imaginations, from childish sandbox games to grown-up anxieties about venturing into unknown lands. But these days, quicksand can’t even scare an 8-year-old.

Interviewing a class of fourth graders, writer Dan Engber discovered that most understood the concept, but didn’t find it particularly worrisome.  ”I usually don’t think about it,” said one.  They were more afraid of things like aliens, zombies, ghosts, and dinosaurs.  But they understood that it was something that people used to be afraid of: ”My dad told me that when he was little his friends always said ‘look out that could be quicksand!’”

Engber became fascinated with what happened to quicksand.  He found a source of data — compiled by, of all things, quicksand sexual fetishists — that included every movie scene that involved quicksand from the 1900s to the 2000s.  Comparing this number to the total number of movies produced allowed him to show that quicksand had a lifecourse.  It rose in the ’40s, skyrocketed in the ’60s, and then fell out of favor.

Why?

Engber found a pattern in the data.  In quicksand’s early years, the movie scenes featured quicksand as a very serious threat.  But, after quicksand peaked, it became a  joke.  In the ’80s, quicksand even made it into My Little Pony and Perfect Strangers.  Later, in discussions about plot lines for Lost, the idea of quicksand was dismissed as ridiculous.

I guess it’s fair to say that quicksand “jumped the shark.”

In sociology, we call this the social construction of social problems: the fact that our fears don’t perfectly correlate with the hazards we face.  In this case, media is implicated. What is it making us fear today?

Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions, with Myra Marx Ferree. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

(via bellfry)

mayakern:

life of an artist

(via bellfry)

annachibi:

libraryoftheancients:

gamzadoodle-makarkles:

sublimesublemon:

yesthisiskenzie:

quazza:

i am reminded that english is a flawed language every time I am forced to use “that that” in a sentence

it’s not fair that that happens

It makes it sound like the English language had gone out to dinner and had had too much to drink.

Get out 

You think “that that” is bad?

Allow Wikipedia to explain you a thing about buffalo.

oh my god

(via theanimejunkie)

greatesthungergamesfans:

500daysofsassy:

my brother has been saying to me “have you seen the lenny kravitz scarf picture yet?????????????????????????????” and i always have no idea what he was talking about 

and now ive seen the light

image

he’s here to make an impression

(Source: notkatniss, via hi)

thurdsay:

after i die i’ll probably still complain

(via hi)

the-troyler-phan:

stability:

This sums up all my friendships with anyone ever

Idk which face is the most accurate

the-troyler-phan:

stability:

This sums up all my friendships with anyone ever

Idk which face is the most accurate

(Source: stability, via hi)